Trump Presidency – The Greatest or the Worst – Opinions from Thought Leaders and Political Commentators

NEW BOOK FOR DOWNLOAD

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Donald Trump has brought a new energy and excitement to the election process. He has stimulated the younger voting demographic and has become, perhaps, the most controversial and polarizing personality in US electoral history. His supporters absolutely love him and his non-supporters are distraught with Donald Trump representing the Republican Party and possibly becoming the 45th US President of the United States.

With the the election campaign upon us, we need to take a closer look at this “political phenomenon”. I have tapped into the most current thinking of our country’s thought leaders, political commentators, likely voters, current affairs magazines and newspapers to provide a balanced perspective on whether Trump ( if elected ) would become one of the greatest or one of the worst US Presidents in our history.

Read this book if you are undecided or just curious, and would like a deeper rational before deciding to vote For or Against Donald Trump. And then get out and VOTE!

This non-partisan 72 page book covers both opinions and can be immediately downloaded for ONLY $1.00! And then comment below on what you believe will happen if elected.

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One Comment

  1. says:

    July 22, 2016 at 10:05 pm

    There’s no denying Trump has done a good job of making himself rich — he’s worth somewhere between $4.5 billion and $10 billion, depending who you ask. Can he make the rest of America rich, too?

    The economy isn’t something Trump looks forward to tackling. In a January interview with “Good Morning America,” Trump offered up a bleak assessment of the U.S. economy but added that, in terms of fixing it, it’s a task he’d rather skip.

    “We’re in a bubble,” he said. “And, frankly, if there’s going to be a bubble popping, I hope they pop before I become president because I don’t want to inherit all this stuff. I’d rather it be the day before rather than the day after, I will tell you that.”

    In an April interview with the Washington Post, Trump reiterated his doomsday view of the economy, suggesting we might be headed for recession. But this time around, he appeared more open to the idea of his being in charge of finding remedies. “I can fix it. I can fix it pretty quickly,” he said.

    Many Americans appear to believe that is the case and that, more broadly, a Trump presidency would be good for the economy. According to a recent CNBC All-America Survey, Americans rate Trump and Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton evenly on key economic issues. And in a January Zogby poll, Trump rated better than the former secretary of state.

    Trump has certainly been this election cycle’s most riveting figure. He initially focused his attention on immigration reform, calling for a wall to be built between Mexico and the United States and demanding the deportation of 11 million undocumented immigrants.

    He has since rolled out other policies and positions: a major tax code overhaul; repeal and replace Obamacare; renegotiate or “break” NAFTA; stop hedge funds from “getting away with murder” on taxes; reforming the Veteran’s Administration; and impose import tariffs as high as 35%. All while keeping the deficit in check, growing the economy and leaving entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security untouched. Immigration remains a major pillar of his campaign, and he has now moved on to the question of Muslim immigration as well. He has finally laid out a plan to make Mexico pay for the wall, too.

    Trump has made plenty of enemies along the way as well, including but limited to fellow GOP contenders Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, Fox News journalist Megyn Kelly, the media in general and even the Pope.

    Those who fear Trump’s plans should find common cause with those who love them: “I’m not sure how much of what he actually says today will be his positions a year from now,” said Michael Busler, professor of finance at Stockton University.

    Trump’s own campaign has suggested he is playing “a part” to garner votes.

    While Trump certainly has some grandiose ideas — and equally lofty rhetoric to accompany them — deciphering the exact nature of his economic policies is a complex task, according to John Hudak, a fellow in governance studies at Washington, D.C.-based think tank the Brookings Institution.

    Not to mention the fact that if he does make it to the Oval Office, Trump won’t have a free pass from Congress, even if it remains under the control of the Republican Party (as you’ll see, many of his positions don’t exactly hew closely to GOP policies).

    Taking legislative hurdles out of the equation, what will the U.S. economy and markets look like if Trump becomes No. 45.

    Trump’s Expensive Immigration Plan

    Trump’s immigration plans cost him a handful of business deals, but they might cost the United States much more.

    The American Action Forum, a right-leaning policy institute based in Washington D.C., estimates that immediately and fully enforcing current immigration law, as Trump has suggested, would cost the federal government from $400 billion to $600 billion. It would shrink the labor force by 11 million workers, reduce the real GDP by $1.6 trillion and take 20 years to complete (Trump has said he could do it in 18 months).

    “It will harm the U.S. economy,” said Doug Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum and chief economic policy adviser to Sen. John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign. “Immigration is an enormous source of economic vitality.”

    The impact would be felt on both supply and demand.

    There’s no denying Trump has done a good job of making himself rich — he’s worth somewhere between $4.5 billion and $10 billion, depending who you ask. Can he make the rest of America rich, too?

    The economy isn’t something Trump looks forward to tackling. In a January interview with “Good Morning America,” Trump offered up a bleak assessment of the U.S. economy but added that, in terms of fixing it, it’s a task he’d rather skip.

    “We’re in a bubble,” he said. “And, frankly, if there’s going to be a bubble popping, I hope they pop before I become president because I don’t want to inherit all this stuff. I’d rather it be the day before rather than the day after, I will tell you that.”

    In an April interview with the Washington Post, Trump reiterated his doomsday view of the economy, suggesting we might be headed for recession. But this time around, he appeared more open to the idea of his being in charge of finding remedies. “I can fix it. I can fix it pretty quickly,” he said.

    Many Americans appear to believe that is the case and that, more broadly, a Trump presidency would be good for the economy. According to a recent CNBC All-America Survey, Americans rate Trump and Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton evenly on key economic issues. And in a January Zogby poll, Trump rated better than the former secretary of state.

    Trump has certainly been this election cycle’s most riveting figure. He initially focused his attention on immigration reform, calling for a wall to be built between Mexico and the United States and demanding the deportation of 11 million undocumented immigrants.

    He has since rolled out other policies and positions: a major tax code overhaul; repeal and replace Obamacare; renegotiate or “break” NAFTA; stop hedge funds from “getting away with murder” on taxes; reforming the Veteran’s Administration; and impose import tariffs as high as 35%. All while keeping the deficit in check, growing the economy and leaving entitlement programs like Medicare and Social Security untouched. Immigration remains a major pillar of his campaign, and he has now moved on to the question of Muslim immigration as well. He has finally laid out a plan to make Mexico pay for the wall, too.

    Trump has made plenty of enemies along the way as well, including but limited to fellow GOP contenders Ted Cruz and Jeb Bush, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, Fox News journalist Megyn Kelly, the media in general and even the Pope.

    Those who fear Trump’s plans should find common cause with those who love them: “I’m not sure how much of what he actually says today will be his positions a year from now,” said Michael Busler, professor of finance at Stockton University.

    Trump’s own campaign has suggested he is playing “a part” to garner votes.

    While Trump certainly has some grandiose ideas — and equally lofty rhetoric to accompany them — deciphering the exact nature of his economic policies is a complex task, according to John Hudak, a fellow in governance studies at Washington, D.C.-based think tank the Brookings Institution.

    Not to mention the fact that if he does make it to the Oval Office, Trump won’t have a free pass from Congress, even if it remains under the control of the Republican Party (as you’ll see, many of his positions don’t exactly hew closely to GOP policies).

    Taking legislative hurdles out of the equation, what will the U.S. economy and markets look like if Trump becomes No. 45.

    Trump’s Expensive Immigration Plan

    Trump’s immigration plans cost him a handful of business deals, but they might cost the United States much more.

    The American Action Forum, a right-leaning policy institute based in Washington D.C., estimates that immediately and fully enforcing current immigration law, as Trump has suggested, would cost the federal government from $400 billion to $600 billion. It would shrink the labor force by 11 million workers, reduce the real GDP by $1.6 trillion and take 20 years to complete (Trump has said he could do it in 18 months).

    “It will harm the U.S. economy,” said Doug Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum and chief economic policy adviser to Sen. John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign. “Immigration is an enormous source of economic vitality.”

    The impact would be felt on both supply and demand.

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